Sunday, December 7, 2008

Is the Recession Affecting My Writing?

I'd have to say, no. It's not affecting my querying, either. I got a bunch that I sent out just last week. I intended to send more this week, but sometimes, intentions are like . . . well, never mind.

Anyway, I'm not letting the recession affect my writing or my writing plans. Life goes on. What goes up must come down, and what sinks in the ocean eventually bobs back up. If I lose my job, that'll be another story, but my job seems good so my writing plans are unchanged. I'll still write my slightly off-the-beaten-path stories. Just this morning, I loaded up my Neo with a bunch of different possibilities:
  • A Christian thriller. I've blogged about this one before. The first three chapters zoomed by like a rocket sled, but now I'm a bit stalled in a "what do I do next" complex. Sounds like a good time to throw a problem at my hero, whose name is Max.
  • A Hollywood Romance. I've blogged about this one as well. This one will be unusual because it will have no sex scenes. The entire story takes place before the couple's long-delayed and much-hyped first date.
  • A modern fantasy. This is the comic book/graphic novel I alluded to in the previous post. I reread it today and hooboy! Have I ever improved! All the "telling" rather than "showing," even when I was describing something for an artist to draw. Anyway, it's sort of a superhero novel, but sans costumes. With immortals.
  • And Starcaster, Book Two. Tentatively entitled A Spy and a Lady.
  • A Snow White retelling short story. I have a very exciting plot but I've kind of backed myself into a corner. I need to think of something really clever to get out of it, and I'm not sure if I'm clever enough to think of it.
If you write, has the recession affected your writing plans?

12 comments:

  1. I'm going to say yes on this. Self-publishing will forever sound like the "easy way out" for first-time authors, but with the economy being what it is and even mid-list established authors getting cut from the big houses, I have decided it's the way to go for my debut (154k word fantasy novel). Based on the responses I got from numerous queries, I think it's just going to be harder to break into the business with this one at this moment, but I am not all "head in the clouds" about self-publishing; I intend to do all the work necessary to make the book a success.

    I will, however, pursue traditional routes after I enter my 2nd novel (commercial fiction with religious satire) in the ABNA come February.

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  2. I have never considered self publishing fiction. However, I am still toying with the idea of self-publishing my "Word for the Writer" series, if I can ever get at least eight decent-length articles written.

    I don't think self-publishing is an easy way out. Yes, it gets your book in print, but what a lot of work! If you're young and single, I suppose it is something you can consider. But I just don't have the time or money to put into such an endeavor.

    If I get to the age of 65 or so, and if I have not managed to get published by then (still quite a ways to go), I will self-publish my fiction, so it can at least stay in the family.

    I have just finished my 3rd novel (or 4th, if you count the 230,000 doorstop as two novels). I expect the doorstop to stay forever unpublished, but I'm still trying with my second two. I consider them as inventory that I'm trying to sell.

    Alex Bledsoe is my hero. He got published on his 6th novel, now he's busy selling all his other unpublished novels.

    I'm not trying to dissuade you; I'm just telling you my point of view.

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  3. Oh, I wouldn't take it as dissuasion (and, anyway, I'm pretty hard to dissuade, as it happens). I will always try to go the standard route to publishing before going POD/SP, I can tell you that, but at this point since I am still < 30 and okay with going the weekend-warrior route to self-marketing, I think I can make it work.

    Besides, it's always been my M.O. to have many different irons in the fire. Just have to make sure I set aside enough writing time while juggling the rest. Too bad I can't quit my day job just yet!

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  4. I would think people might have 'more time' to write since they might need to cut out/cut down going out.
    Says me, who has written since May!

    TD - Self Publishing is more costly, and also, it will get your book in print but are you willing to fork out the money to advertise your book? People don't tend to flock to self publish sites to buy books so you'll need to buy a package that includes an ISBN so that your book can be for sale on Amazon and B&N.com. Good luck to you.

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  5. What a weird coincidence. This is the second fairy tale which both of us have retellings of. I've got a Snow White retelling on submission right now. I have an idea for a superhero novel, too, except that mine is set in the middle ages. I don't think that's been done before, so I figure, "Why not?"

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  6. I love the medieval superhero idea! Very cool concept!

    My Snow White story has been writer's blocked for so long I'm beginning to despair that I'll never finish it.

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  7. A lot of POD sites (most of them, I should hope) procure the ISBN for you for a nominal fee, but yes the route is definitely more costly in money and time than getting "picked up" by a traditional house. I just think, with the economy being what it is and me still being new to the scene, it's better to make something happen than sit back and wait for lightning to strike, I guess. I haven't actually "taken the leap" yet, though.

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  8. Notice that you have a 'followers' role - one correction. I already am a fan - I'm just waiting for the published book to hold in my hand!

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  9. Nope. Now, a sick child on the other hand...

    I mostly wanted to make sure you saw this...

    http://www.mediabistro.com/galleycat/on/building_a_genre_book_review_index_103090.asp?c=rss

    I thought of you immediately. I'm not entirely sure why, though... *grin*

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  10. Yes. I still can't decide what to polish up next. Should I-

    1) Figure it's pointless right now and write whatever I want. Wait six months and see what happens. Maybe look into Lulu.com.

    or

    2) Polish up my steampunkish YA Historical, because that kind of thing does seem to be selling just a tiny bit. By the time it's ready (maybe six months) the industry might be on the upswing.

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  11. Umm... sounds like you can/should do both.

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